Commit only part of a file in Git

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Top 5 Answer for Commit only part of a file in Git

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94

You can use git add --patch <filename> (or -p for short), and git will begin to break down your file into what it thinks are sensible "hunks" (portions of the file). It will then prompt you with this question:

Stage this hunk [y,n,q,a,d,/,j,J,g,s,e,?]? 

Here is a description of each option:

  • y stage this hunk for the next commit
  • n do not stage this hunk for the next commit
  • q quit; do not stage this hunk or any of the remaining hunks
  • a stage this hunk and all later hunks in the file
  • d do not stage this hunk or any of the later hunks in the file
  • g select a hunk to go to
  • / search for a hunk matching the given regex
  • j leave this hunk undecided, see next undecided hunk
  • J leave this hunk undecided, see next hunk
  • k leave this hunk undecided, see previous undecided hunk
  • K leave this hunk undecided, see previous hunk
  • s split the current hunk into smaller hunks
  • e manually edit the current hunk
    • You can then edit the hunk manually by replacing +/- by # (thanks veksen)
  • ? print hunk help

If the file is not in the repository yet, you can first do git add -N <filename>. Afterwards you can go on with git add -p <filename>.

Afterwards, you can use:

  • git diff --staged to check that you staged the correct changes
  • git reset -p to unstage mistakenly added hunks
  • git commit -v to view your commit while you edit the commit message.

Note this is far different than the git format-patch command, whose purpose is to parse commit data into a .patch files.

Reference for future: Git Tools - Interactive Staging

vote vote

84

You can use git add --interactive or git add -p <file>, and then git commit (not git commit -a); see Interactive mode in git-add manpage, or simply follow instructions.

Modern Git has also git commit --interactive (and git commit --patch, which is shortcut to patch option in interactive commit).

If you prefer doing it from GUI, you can use git-gui. You can simply mark chunks which you want to have included in commit. I personally find it easier than using git add -i. Other git GUIs, like QGit or GitX, might also have this functionality as well.

vote vote

73

git gui provides this functionality under the diff view. Just right click the line(s) you're interested in and you should see a "stage this line to commit" menu item.

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63

I believe that git add -e myfile is the easiest way (my preference at least) since it simply opens a text editor and lets you choose which line you want to stage and which line you don't. Regarding editing commands:

added content:

Added content is represented by lines beginning with "+". You can prevent staging any addition lines by deleting them.

removed content:

Removed content is represented by lines beginning with "-". You can prevent staging their removal by converting the "-" to a " " (space).

modified content:

Modified content is represented by "-" lines (removing the old content) followed by "+" lines (adding the replacement content). You can prevent staging the modification by converting "-" lines to " ", and removing "+" lines. Beware that modifying only half of the pair is likely to introduce confusing changes to the index.

Every details about git add are available on git --help add

vote vote

60

If you are using vim, you may want to try the excellent plugin called fugitive.

You can see the diff of a file between working copy and index with :Gdiff, and then add lines or hunks to the index using classic vim diff commands like dp. Save the modifications in the index and commit with :Gcommit, and you're done.

Very good introductory screencasts here (see esp. part 2).

Top 3 video Explaining Commit only part of a file in Git

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