php - Strict Standards: Declaration of ' ' should be compatible with ' '

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Top 5 Answer for php - Strict Standards: Declaration of ' ' should be compatible with ' '

vote vote

91

WC_Payment_Gateway is defined in abstract-wc-payment-gateway.php and declares a method

function process_payment() {} 

while WC_Gateway_BACS defines it as

function process_payment( $order_id ) { ... 

(maybe you mixed up WC_Payment_Gateway and WC_Payment_Gateways).

So, different signature (0 parameters vs 1 parameter) -> strict error.
Since it seems* to be used always with one parameter you could change

function process_payment() {} 

to

function process_payment($order_id) {} 

(*) keep in mind I know of woocommerce only since the last five minutes, so don't take my word for it.

vote vote

89

Quote from PHP Manual

In PHP 5 a new error level E_STRICT is available. Prior to PHP 5.4.0 E_STRICT was not >included within E_ALL, so you would have to explicitly enable this kind of error level in >PHP < 5.4.0. Enabling E_STRICT during development has some benefits. STRICT messages >provide suggestions that can help ensure the best interoperability and forward >compatibility of your code. These messages may include things such as calling non-static >methods statically, defining properties in a compatible class definition while defined in >a used trait, and prior to PHP 5.3 some deprecated features would issue E_STRICT errors >such as assigning objects by reference upon instantiation.

You are receiving this error because WC_Gateway_BACS::process_payment() declaration is different than WC_Payment_Gateway::process_payment() (might be not the same amount of parameters etc). If WC_Payment_Gateway has no method process_payment, check it's parent class :)

Also, if you want to disable STRICT errors, add ^ E_STRICT to your error reporting configuration, for example:

error_reporting(E_ALL ^ E_STRICT); 
vote vote

80

if you wanna keep OOP form without turning any error off, you can also:

class A {     public function foo() {         ;     } } class B extends A {     /*instead of :      public function foo($a, $b, $c) {*/     public function foo() {         list($a, $b, $c) = func_get_args();         // ...      } } 
vote vote

61

When you are using the same function in a parent class and a child class, but the child class needs parameters while the parent one not, you'll get the Strict Standards error.

Example

Manager:

public function getAtPosition($position) {     foreach ($this->getList() as $obj)     {         if ($obj->getPosition() == $position)             return $obj;     }      return null; } 

MenuManager extends Manager:

public function getAtPosition($position, $parent) {     foreach ($this->getList() as $m)     {         if ($m->getParent() == $parent && $m->getPosition() == $position)             return $m;     }      return null; } 

This example will generate an error:

Strict standards: Declaration of MenuManager::getAtPosition() should be compatible with Manager::getAtPosition($position)

Because we don't have the same arguments to the function, so let's trick this and add arguments, even though we're not using them!

Manager:

public function getAtPosition($position, $dummy = 0) // Dummy to avoid Strict standards errors {     foreach ($this->getList() as $obj)     {         if ($obj->getPosition() == $position)             return $obj;     }      return null; } 

MenuManager extends Manager:

public function getAtPosition($position, $parent = 0) {     foreach ($this->getList() as $m)     {         if ($m->getParent() == $parent && $m->getPosition() == $position)             return $m;     }      return null; } 

Only one to be careful is that when using getAtPosition() from MenuManager.class.php, be sure you are actually sending 2 parameters, as we have to declare $parent = 0 in order to match the parent's declaration.

Every class extending Manager and not containing getAtPosition() will use the method from Manager.

If declared in a child class, php will use the method from the child class instead of the parent's one. There is no overloading in PHP, so that is how I worked around it until it is properly implemented.

vote vote

51

Here is a better answer - https://stackoverflow.com/a/9243127/2165415

for example,
parentClass::customMethod($thing = false) and
childClass::customMethod($thing)
so, when you call customMethod() for the class, it may trigger the error, because the child's method hasn't defined a default value for the first argument.

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